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More global warming…..snow in the Sahara…..

8 January 2018 Cool Shit


Sahara Desert covered in 15 inches of SNOW as freak weather blankets sand dunes

More than 15 inches (40cm) has blanketed sand dunes across the small town of Ain Sefra, Algeria. It is the second time snow has hit in nearly 40 years, with a dusting also recorded in December 2016. But this snowfall which hit yesterday, is much deeper than the fleeting shower little more than a year ago.


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  • TheAhmedClockCompany

    ” … that’s entirely what one would expect from global warming, er
    climate change … “

  • Herbsman200

    So do you really think the weather pattern has not changed in the last 20 or so years? I don’t remember the west burning to hell when I was young. NJ never got a hurricane Remember Jersey Shore.

    • EarnitYourself

      CA has always burnt. “It never rains in California”. They deal with drought and wildfires all the time.
      Hurricanes have gotten to New England plenty in history. Sandy was a superstorm that joined up with another system and got pushed on shore. Kind of an anomaly.

      The fact is, no connection can be drawn between climate change and the man made causes of it. The push is to create a clean energy push, which is noble, but prohibitively expensive.
      Solyndra was a half billion dollar waste that never had a chance. Just a way to funnel taxpayer money to political supporters. The Chinese were selling solar panels for less than Solyndra could make them.

      • Herbsman200

        Again Earn…. lets look at the last 20 years… I grew up where April showers bring May flowers…. it is no longer like that anymore. There’s no more I’m dreaming of a white Christmas cause it rarely snows in Dec anymore. You may want to ignore it but I see it clear as day. It snowed in FL just last week that is not normal.

        • grandma954

          The seasons are off a bit because I think the world has shifted a bit. But theres always big changes about every 20 years or so. Just go back and see all the stuff. They were talking stuff like this years ago..

          • EarnitYourself

            Exactly Gma. I remember as a kid, the hysterics were warning of a pending ice age.

            The best meme for this issue is the one that says “When Al Gore was born, there were 7,000 polar bears in the world. Now, there are only 30,000.”

          • grandma954

            Its the same with all the bomb talk, back in school we have bomb drills not fire drills, people built bomb shelters. Pot was a gate way drug. Now all that is being said again. I just heard Jeff Sessions say People who smoke pot are as bad as people who do heroin. Give me a break. Ive smoked for at least 40 years and never made me want to do any other drug. Ive never been bombed, never had to live in a bomb shelter. The Gov. has been scaring people for years. Everyone have your tin hats ready…The sky is falling, again !!!!

          • EarnitYourself

            Ya, I vaguely remember the get under your desk drills. As if that was going to save us from getting vaporized by nukes.

          • grandma954

            I know right….lol

          • BerkeleyLifer

            Duck & cover πŸ˜‰πŸ‘πŸ»

        • EarnitYourself

          The Texans were frustrated because like all libs, you were making it up as you go and stating it as fact. Like you are right now.
          You grew up in Brooklyn. It still works like that up there. Does it fluctuate a month in one direction or the other? Sure, but seasonals come out of dormancy and grow and bloom every year.
          If you’re looking at the bald, Sandy spots in your lawn in Boca, yes, no flowers there.
          As for your snow argument, pick a side, will ya? Lol. Are we not getting snow where we should? Or are we getting snow where we shouldn’t? You went wack a mole on yourself in that post.

          Maybe it wasn’t reported in Texas, but most of the country got hit by blizzard conditions in the last couple weeks.

          The ball drop in Times Square was the second coldest in history.

          Are you taking Al’s position?

          That these record cold temps are proof of warming?

          • Herbsman200

            in the 70’s and 80’s there was snow this time of year. Although the weather at the ball drop was the coldest there was NO SNOW. In FL just last year our rainy season went from April to June. Cmon Earn

          • EarnitYourself

            Dude. Precipitation and temperature are two different things.
            Low pressure systems drive precipitation. Temps drive what form it takes.

            I’m just not seeing anything more than normal cyclical patterns.

          • Charles___Darwin

            Does this sound familiar;”Washington Post: β€œWithin a few years it is predicted due to ice melt the sea will rise & make most coastal cities uninhabitable.”

            Well, it’s from the Washington Post…in 1922.

            https://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/playing-climate-change-telephone

          • EarnitYourself

            Lol. I think it’s just hype to fuel bogus taxpayer funding of niche technologies the crooks set up.

            Whether it be through grants or tax credits, solar outfits can get installs they’d never get on a level playing field against traditional electric applications.

            The windmills are a complete joke. I bumped into a farm of them in extreme upstate NY a few years back when driving around to see foliage.
            What a debacle. There is no way a profit driven entity makes that capital investment and commits to perpetual rent and maintenance costs for such a low producer of power.
            The only return on investment in that deal was the windmill guy who donated to the politician who bought them.

        • grandma954

          But has happen before . I was there…

        • Charles___Darwin

          Does this sound familiar;”Washington Post: β€œWithin a few years it is predicted due to ice melt the sea will rise & make most coastal cities uninhabitable.”

          Gloom and doom.

          Well, it’s from the Washington Post…in 1922.
          https://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/playing-climate-change-telephone

          • Herbsman200

            cmon I say that was fear tactics….sort of like the reefer madness video of the 60’s that was pure foolishness.

          • grandma954

            And still is today PURE foolishness…

          • Herbsman200

            Very true… I can’t wait until we vote recreational in FL… I will change business plans REAL quick….lol go on Netfix and watch Cash Crop…very interesting documentary

          • grandma954

            Seen it, have friends that have a bit of stock in it. This is not a foolish man ,has made millions. I don’t think they san stop this now. Too much money out there…

          • Herbsman200

            Yes that is the new Gold (Green) rush. I notice there are a few marijuana stocks out there. in the penny stocks. I just want to grow money like they do on the west coast.

          • grandma954

            Me toooo….

          • EarnitYourself

            Oh no! It’s true. Reefer will make you jump out of a window.

            Especially if you’re smoking it in your first floor bedroom and you hear your mom’s car pull in the driveway. Trust me on this one.

          • grandma954

            lololol

          • Herbsman200

            hahahahaha I take you speak from experience….. see you Americans…in the islands weed is just another seasoning.

        • TheAhmedClockCompany

          that’s just Hell warming up.
          she’s got a big job
          ahead of her, getting ready
          to welcome billions
          of migrants …

          does a bear shit in the …
          … sahara?

    • Charles___Darwin

      http://www.hurricanescience.org/history/storms/1940s/GreatAtlantic/

      Plenty hurricanes hit the North Atlantic seaboard, here’s one from 1944.

      • Herbsman200

        from 1944…but in the last 5 years there were more than just that one off Charles.

        • Charles___Darwin

          Check that website. Hurricanes hitting up north are more common than you think. People has a “confirmation bias”….we see things that support our belief.
          If one thinks there are more hurricanes, we tend to notice them.

          There are always lots of hurricanes in the Gulf and Atlantic, but if they don’t hit land we don’t notice them. We didn’t have any real Florida hurricanes for 10 years, but 2017 was bad. 2018 could be bad too, but is it “proof” of climate change? no, just the laws of statistics.

          • Herbsman200

            I love documentaries… so the fact that we are losing our polar caps is just a coincidence? That is where the flood propaganda you spoke of came from. Imagine the poles lost all that ice where would the water go? Yes I know what I am saying is hypothetical but a thought becomes a theory, then after research that will become fact. We humans are destroying the earth

          • Charles___Darwin

            My point was they were saying that back in the 20’s. I was much colder in the 30’s. Natural cycles.

          • i love me a selfie

            LMAO fraudsman200…now you’re a meteorologist…hahahahahahahahaha

          • High_Yellow3

            He’s back a dumber than ever.

          • Herbsman200

            Hey that’s fine but I would rather be dumb and rich than think I’m smart and poor like you

          • High_Yellow3

            Here we go.
            OK Bruce Wein Sr., tell us about all the money you have, the great big house you have, all the expensive cruises you’ve been on and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.

            You bore me to tears with your stupid comments.

          • Herbsman200

            I don’t have to say anything…. But the fact is I could …can you and be truthful? Sucks to be a broke white boy don’t it

          • High_Yellow3

            LOL

          • Herbsman200

            Is that all you got simpleton… POS ass white boy.

          • High_Yellow3

            Racist.

          • Pompano Queen1

            Yep!

          • EarnitYourself

            The documentaries you’re taking as gospel are the very propoganda itself.

            It’s groupthink, and you are clearly 100% bought in.

          • Herbsman200

            Cmon Earn…. not everything that is said is taken as gospel but just because you don’t understand science doesn’t mean the scientist are lying.

          • EarnitYourself

            Okay, professor Herbie. Produce one spec of empirical evidence that there is such a thing as man made global warming, and quantify that against fully natural climate swings that have happened since the beginnng of recorded time.

            If you can do that, you’ll be rich. Because not a single person on Earth has yet.

            The people who pay scientists to “reach consensus that the Earth is warming” fund their research. They pay them to reach “convenient” conclusions.
            They also pay film makers to produce “documentaries” that the weak minded will buy into emotionally and say “hey! It’s on film. It’s a documentary. It must be true. There’s no way the money behind all this is the clean energy industry.”

            B B B B B B B

            I still like you. You’re not that ba-a-a-d…..

          • Herbsman200

            SO I am sure you remember when the gov’t was sending missiles and other aircraft into clouds to manipulate the weather?

          • EarnitYourself

            I remember no such thing. But if you’re telling me they tried it, how did it work out? I’m betting it failed.

          • Herbsman200

            of course it failed…. but you can’t say humans are not affecting this climate change. We are… Why the big push to go green?

          • EarnitYourself

            Have we been having two different conversations?
            Always follow the money, Herbie.
            I have a friend in Ohio who is filthy rich, because his uncle and him started an asbestos removal business when they saw the government mandated removal movement starting.
            Another friend in Michigan is crazy rich because his father built a crazy profitable business dealing with the toxic waste that is a natural bi-product of making fiberglass boats.
            If your A/C compressor fails, you’ll have to do the inside airhandler and replace the whole system to move to the “clean” refrigerant, if you’re still on the old type.

            So anyway, the go green industry is pushing the narrative that we’re all going to die if we don’t go to their products.

            They pay to have your “documentaries” produced.

            Massive chunks of ice have been breaking off and falling into the ocean forever.
            The documentaries just don’t take the helicopter ride to the top of the glacier to show you where it’s being replenished. Here’s the Fox glacier on the South Island of New Zealand.

          • EarnitYourself
          • EarnitYourself
      • Lt Bil Drat

        August 1904 – An extratropical storm with hurricane-force winds left behind damage in southeastern Massachusetts, especially Martha’s Vineyard. Trees were downed in Providence, Rhode Island, and New Bedford, Massachusetts. Center moved NE just within the coastline from Carolinas, with its eastern sector intact over ocean. The storm then tracked across Long Island and eastern Rhode Island. Much marine destruction with heavy losses in Buzzards Bay, Vineyard Sound and Massachusetts Bay.
        July 21, 1916 – A Category 1 hurricane moved north from open Atlantic, crossing the Buzzards Bay/Cape Cod area of Massachusetts. Hourly wind reports indicated sustained 50 mph (80 km/h) but actual winds were higher than hourly observations. Gusts of 85 mph (137 km/h) recorded in southeast Massachusetts and Cape Cod.
        August 1917 – A tropical storm sank four ships while passing offshore of Nantucket, Massachusetts, killing 41 sailors. The storm later made landfall in New Brunswick before becoming post-tropical.
        August 1924 – A Category 1 hurricane with a large center moved over and just east of Cape Cod. It was a severe hurricane in New Bedford and Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. New Bedford Newspaper (Mercury) published photo journal of the hurricanes severity. The system is often overlooked, however much material is present to include it as destructive storm. On Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket, it is often considered worse than the 1938 hurricane. Widespread wind losses to structures were reported. Very heavy tree damage in New Bedford north to Plymouth Massachusetts. The storm was later destructive in Nova Scotia.
        November 3-4, 1927 – The remnants of a tropical storm spawned torrential rains as it passed over the Green Mountains in Vermont. The record flooding caused $40 million in damage and killed 84 people in Vermont and 1 in Rhode Island.[10] The storm ended as snow in the mountains. Note that this flood was unrelated to the 1927 Mississippi Flood.
        September 9, 1934 – A strong tropical storm crossed Long Island and lost strength from slow movement as it moved through Connecticut much in a similar manner as Hurricane Belle of August 1976. Trees downed in Providence, Rhode Island, and New Haven, Conn.
        September 1936 – A Category 1 hurricane moved east-northeast over Block Island and Nantucket Sounds after moving up East Coast of U.S. north of North Carolina and Virginia. The storm was destructive in Providence, Rhode Island, and eastern Massachusetts. Boston had 80 mph (129 km/h) winds at 8 a.m. on the 18th as the storm moved east along the south coast of Cape Cod and the Islands. There was much media coverage, but this storm was later eclipsed by the extreme hurricane two years later. Heavy wind-damage was realized across all of eastern Massachusetts.
        September 21, 1938 – New England Hurricane of 1938 – This storm made landfall on Long Island and Connecticut as a Category 3 hurricane. Wind gusts reached Category 5 strength in eastern Connecticut, Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts west of Buzzards Bay and Cape Cod. The anemometer at the Blue Hill Observatory registered a peak wind gust of 186 mph (299 km/h) before the instrument broke. The hurricane lost strength as it tracked into interior areas of New England, but it is believed to have been at Category 2 intensity as it crossed into Vermont and at minimal Category 1 intensity as it tracked into Quebec. The storm killed over 600 people and is considered to be the worst hurricane to strike New England in modern times.
        September 15, 1944 – The Great Atlantic Hurricane made landfall near the Connecticut/Rhode Island border as a Category 1 hurricane, causing severe wind damage in southeastern Massachusetts and across the Cape and Islands. Damage on Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard was considered worse than that in 1938, with severe wind damage in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Much structural damage and much of the forest that had somehow escaped being decimated in 1938 fell victim to this storm. A total of 28 people died in New England due to the hurricane.[11]
        September 1950 – Hurricane Dog was a major offshore hurricane that moved very close to Nantucket. Hurricane conditions occurred across southeast Massachusetts. New Bedford Airport reported sustained winds from the north at 75 mph (121 km/h) with gusts to 100 mph (160 km/h).
        September 7, 1953 – Hurricane Carol made landfall near Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, with considerable wind losses throughout the region. This hurricane was eclipsed by the extreme damage of another Carol the very next year.
        The Edgewood Yacht Club during Hurricane Carol in 1954
        August 31, 1954 – Hurricane Carol made landfall as a Category 3 hurricane, with gusts of Category 4 strength in southeast Rhode Island and south-coastal Massachusetts in the Buzzards Bay area, west of Cape Cod. Wind gusts of 135 mph (217 km/h) at Block Island, Rhode Island, and 125 mph (201 km/h) in Milton, Massachusetts, were recorded. At least 68 people were killed across New England. Extreme damage was reported in south coastal Rhode Island and south coastal Massachusetts. Damage in the Buzzards Bay region rivaled that of the 1938 hurricane.
        September 11, 1954 – Hurricane Edna made landfall on Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard as a strong Category 2 hurricane, just two weeks after Carol, with very severe losses occurring. Hourly wind readings of 90 mph (145 km/h) were recorded at New Bedford Airport in New Bedford, Massachusetts; 100 mph (161 km/h) in Taunton, Massachusetts, 112 mph (180 km/h) in Milton, Massachusetts, and 125 mph (201 km/h) in Chilmark, Martha’s Vineyard.
        July 11, 1959 – Hurricane Cindy scrapes New England.
        September 12-13, 1960 – Hurricane Donna makes landfall on Long Island, New York as a minimal Category 2 hurricane, and in Connecticut as a strong Category 1 hurricane. Peak wind gusts of 140 mph (225 km/h) at the Blue Hill Observatory in Massachusetts and 135 mph (217 km/h) on Block Island, Rhode Island. Hourly peak wind gusts at New Bedford Airport in Massachusetts recorded 110 mph (177 km/h) winds from the south-southwest in a sheltered area. Heavy tree, utility, and structural damage was observed in southeastern Massachusetts, coastal New Hampshire and Maine. Donna was the sixth hurricane to hit southern New England in thirty years. Hourly wind speed readings at City Hall in downtown New Bedford, Massachusetts recorded 80 mph (129 km/h) winds.
        September 26, 1961 – Hurricane Esther moved within 35 miles of the south coast of Rhode Island and Massachusetts as a Category 1 hurricane, before subsequently making a sharp right turn and then making a loop, returning as a tropical storm five days later. Esther remained offshore, but produced hurricane-force wind-gusts from Block Island, Rhode Island, eastward across Cape Cod, Massachusetts, Nantucket, and Martha’s Vineyard. There was less damage than in Hurricane Donna one year prior. Wind gusts of 75 mph (121 km/h) to 90 mph (145 km/h) occurred onshore.
        October 7-8, 1962 – Hurricane Daisy remained offshore, but produced hurricane conditions in coastal northeastern Maine and on Mt. Desert Island.
        October 29, 1963 – Hurricane Ginny remained offshore, but produced hurricane conditions in Nantucket, Massachusetts, and along coastal northeastern Maine.
        August 28, 1971 – Tropical Storm Doria moved into Connecticut after crossing Long Island. Hurricane-force winds were measured at sea level in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Wind gusts up to 80 mph (129 km/h) in southeastern Massachusetts and Blue Hill Observatory.
        September 3, 1972 – Tropical Storm Carrie passed offshore of Cape Cod as a tropical storm, producing hurricane-force wind gusts of 90 mph (145 km/h) in Plymouth, Massachusetts, and 100 mph (160 km/h) in Hyannis, Massachusetts.
        August 10, 1976 – Hurricane Belle’s rather slow movement enabled weakening to set in as the storm approached Long Island, New York, and then moved into Connecticut and Massachusetts, before transversing the Vermont/New Hampshire border. Wind gusts up to 90 mph (145 km/h) were observed in southern Connecticut, 60 mph (97 km/h) in Providence, Rhode Island, and 75 mph (121 km/h) in Newport, Rhode Island.
        September 27, 1985 – Hurricane Gloria crosses Long Island and Connecticut as a Category 1 hurricane, making it the first hurricane of significant strength to hit southern New England since 1960. Widespread wind damage was reported in Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts, and later across coastal New Hampshire and Maine. The tree damage in Connecticut was the worst since the 1938 hurricane, and wind losses in Rhode Island and eastern Massachusetts were considerable to trees, utilities, and roofs. New Bedford, Massachusetts, reported wind gusts over 90 mph (145 km/h), and in Rehoboth, Massachusetts, state police barracks observed 120 mph (193 km/h) winds and also later reported a tornado in the vicinity. Winds at the T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island, gusted to 85 mph (137 km/h), and winds of 100 mph (161 km/h) were recorded on east side of Providence, near Brown University. In addition, winds in New London, Connecticut, were clocked at 110 mph (177 km/h) to 112 mph (180 km/h). Widespread forest damage occurred in Maine. Gloria also produced hurricane-force wind-gusts into New Brunswick, Canada.

        Hurricane Bob approaching New England on August 19, 1991
        August 19, 1991 – Hurricane Bob made landfall on Block Island, Rhode Island, and Newport, Rhode Island, as a Category 2 hurricane. Winds gusted to Category 3 strength in southeastern Massachusetts. Bob was one of the smallest in area and yet most intense hurricanes to hit southern New England since 1938. Storm surge in the Buzzards Bay area of Massachusetts was comparable to that of Hurricane Carol; Bob was considered to be the worst storm in Martha’s Vineyard since the 1944 hurricane. This hurricane was among the top twenty-five costliest U.S. hurricanes of twentieth century. The 1938 and 1944 hurricanes, as well as Carol in 1954, Donna in 1960, and Bob in 1991, are all on the list. A tidal surge of 10 feet (3.0 m) above normal was recorded in upper reaches of Buzzards Bay. A wind gust of 135 mph (217 km/h) was recorded at Block Island before the anemometer blew away. A 125 mph (201 km/h)h wind-gust was recorded in Newport, Rhode Island, and a 5-minute sustained wind speed of 111 mph (179 km/h) with gusts to 144 mph (232 km/h) was observed at Westport Harbour on the south coastal border of southern Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Additional wind recordings include a 120 mph (193 km/h) gust at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy on Buzzards Bay and a 120 mph (193 km/h) gust in Truro, Massachusetts. A one-minute sustained wind speed of 110 mph (177 km/h) was recorded on Chappaquiddick Island, Massachusetts. Several private anemometers in Falmouth, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod reported unofficial gusts of 150 mph (241 km/h). A New Bedford fishing boat off Cuttyhunk Island, MA, reported a peak gust of 162 mph (261 km/h).
        October 30-November 1, 1991 – The Perfect Storm remained offshore, but produced wind gusts to 77 mph (124 km/h) over Cape Cod, and as far west as Jamestown, Rhode Island. Coastal damage was very high in exposed eastern Massachusetts due to high waves and tidal surge. Minor wind damage came just two months after Hurricane Bob, which produced major damage over southeast Massachusetts.
        August 28, 1992 – The remnants of Hurricane Andrew combined with a frontal boundary, and moved from the Mid-Atlantic states into New England. The system dropped light rain and produced light wind across the region.
        September 26, 1992 – The remnants of Tropical Storm Danielle moved just west of New England, but caused rainy conditions throughout the region.
        July 13, 1996 – Tropical Storm Bertha moved into southern New England as a strong tropical storm with 70 mph (113 km/h) sustained winds, and in some exposed areas, winds gusted to minimal hurricane force in southern Rhode Island and south coastal Massachusetts, west of Buzzards Bay. Overall, Bertha produced minor damage, but notable damage in coastal Rhode Island.
        September 2, 1996 – Hurricane Edouard passed offshore as a Category 1 hurricane, producing strong wind-gusts from Buzzards Bay eastward across Cape Cod and the islands of Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard. On Cape Cod, Bertha was a worse storm than Gloria in 1985, but not so destructive as Bob in 1991, which has become a benchmark hurricane on Cape Cod. Considerable losses occurred across Massachusetts, particularly in Oak Bluffs and Martha’s Vineyard.
        October 8, 1996 – The remnants of Tropical Storm Josephine brushed Cape Cod, dropping widespread light rain and wind gusts of 45 mph (72 km/h) to 60 mph (97 km/h) in New Bedford, Massachusetts.[12]
        July 26, 1997 – Tropical Storm Danny stalled just to the south of Nantucket,[13] causing only minor damage, despite strong winds that were experienced in southeastern Massachusetts.[14] The minor damage included minimal flooding, power outages, and downed tree limbs.[15]
        September 17-18, 1999 – After paralleling much of the U.S. East Coast, Tropical Storm Floyd moved into Connecticut and tracked northward through Maine. Floyd caused large power-outages and major flood damage across the region, with over 5 inches (13 cm) of rain falling over most of the area. Danbury, Connecticut, received up to 15 inches (380 mm) of rain from the storm, resulting in extensive flooding in the city and surrounding areas. Mudslides were reported in the Berkshire Mountains of western Massachusetts. Several major highways and a countless number of local roads in Connecticut and Massachusetts were closed for several days due to flooding and downed trees and power lines. Hurricane-force wind gusts were observed in southern Rhode Island; North Kingston unofficially reported wind gusts to 90 mph (145 km/h). Wind gusts to 76 mph (122 km/h) were recorded at the New Bedford Hurricane Dike in New Bedford, Massachusetts, and 73 mph (117 km/h) in Hyannis, Massachusetts.

        • Charles___Darwin

          More proof of global warming!

        • EarnitYourself

          I was in Boston for Bob in 1991. Kind of cool walking around downtown with no cars on the roads.

          • Lt Bil Drat

            I’m from RI and had just left the area visiting returning from Desert Storm earlier. Must have been like a ghost town in Boston. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/1f03139d5f080b5280d366c81ad492b4638a0ecb677656021ffa1f1838184c27.jpg

          • EarnitYourself

            Lmao… perfect. We used to joke that they just paved the horse trails. That was the city planning.
            I had an apartment by the state house, a monthly T pass (subway) and kept my car in an affordable parking garage in Malden, at the Orange line stop for when I wanted to leave the city.

        • grandma954

          Dang, I guess you told him…lol

          • EarnitYourself

            Lmao! Except he doesn’t recognize that as hard data refuting the alarmists’ scary stories.

  • Pompano Queen1

    Love the meme!